Having Dyslexia Means You Are Always Doing Home Work

Our youngest son, whom this website is mostly about, works harder and has more homework than every kid in his class. He has more homework than every kid in this house and most of them are teenagers. Because he has difficulty with reading, writing and spelling, he needs to practice ALL of the time. When […]

Having Dyslexia Means You Are Always Doing Home Work

Our youngest son, whom this website is mostly about, works harder and has more homework than every kid in his class. He has more homework than every kid in this house and most of them are teenagers. Because he has difficulty with reading, writing and spelling, he needs to practice ALL of the time.

When I give him a day off, he and I still do some quick “right brained activities” just to make sure we don't lose any momentum. These are quick 5 – 10 minute activities that might involve throwing a ball back and forth but crossing over the midline. It might also be right brain exercises, that I learned in Dianne Craft's book, Brain Integration Therapy.

Usually our son will bring home 1 math worksheet every day, spelling words to practice, and a book to read either for history or just for fun. (Just for fun, would not be how our son describes reading a book, but I think you get what I mean)

His IEP is set up where if he has 20 math problems, he does half of them. If I think he's on a role, I'll try and push him to do a couple more. I kind of play it by ear. If they are problems he can use a calculator, he does but I make him do half of the problems on paper, just so he doesn't forget how to do them. So that's it as far as math homework goes.

Next we tackle spelling words. Now these we do a variety of ways. I will list all the ways we may practice them, because depending on his mood it's something different every day.

-He needs to write each one 3 times. (we usually do this 2x through out the night with a big break in between where he can go play, watch TV, do video games, etc ..)

-He draws a picture of each word. Whatever he thinks describes the spelling word.

-We play catch, crossing midline (switch off with right and left hand) and I say the word and he needs to repeat it. Sometimes after he has them down pat, he needs to spell them back to me.

-We just started this method. I have him listen to music in his left ear only, and then I say his spelling words and he says them back to me and sometimes spells them also.

So that's a general list of things we (my son and I) do to practice. I know that's not all of them, but you should be able to get the idea. I keep everything short, like 15 minutes. Our son does better if we keep the time short, but just do it a couple of times a night.

Last thing we do is read. Now if he has a required book he has to read (which in his case, I usually read it to him, and then I have him practice reading pages through out the book. I don't have him read the entire assignment by himself, Because since he hates to read, that would just frustrate him. He wouldn't retain anything he read if I made him read it by himself.

If he doesn't have a required reading assignment, then I will find something at home to read. We are doing a couple of programs here and I will work on one of them. The programs we are currently doing is the Barton Reading and Spelling Program by Susan Barton. She has a very thorough website that you should check out if your child has dyslexia and / or trouble reading.

In a nutshell that's what we do every day. He usually gets the weekend off. Now there's always stuff that gets in the way but for the most part I make sure we work on “extra” stuff at least 4x week.

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